Journey to la festa

"The devotion to the Madonna of 115th Street met the emotional and moral needs of a population that had emigrated. In the earliest period, from its founding to the time of Dalia's pastorate, which paralleled the first period of Italian immigration to the closing of the gates, when men were coming alone to New York, participation in the cult assuaged the complicated guilt of the immigrants. The devotion allowed men to be faithful to a woman on these shores as a sign of their faithfulness to the women they had left in Italy. Attendance at their mother's house located the men in the familial strategy of immigration: they had come because of their families and they could remember and acknowledge this in the devotion. In the earliest writings extant at the shrine, the church is identified strongly as 'mamma's house,' and la Madonna is called by the familiar and childlike 'nostra mamma'. By initiating and attending the devotion to the Madonna of 115th Street, the men were declaring their faithfulness not only to their women but also to the moral and cultural system signified and dominated by women. The dimly glowing vigil lights which the earliest male immigrants kept burning in their rooms before images of the Madonna and the saints recalled the men to their moral culture: each night, with the sound of the elevated train coming in through the open windows, the noise of the street and the glowing of the gas factory's stacks, the red lamps summoned the men to be faithful to the values of their people. The devotion and the festa confirmed this and allowed the men to act out their faithfulness. ...There is a way in which the entire festa recapitulated the experience of immigration. The annual celebration also involved a journey... Al of my informants stressed the fact that faithful came from 'all over' to the annual celebration, and they particularly wanted to call to my attention long trips that involved crossing water--from Brooklyn, Staten Island, New Jersey; in each case, it was emphasized that a bridge had to be crossed or a boat taken but that this did not deter the faithful.

"By the principle of 'inverted magnitudes,' the signification of great realities or events by the smallest symbols or objects, the difficulties encountered in getting to the shrine opened out in meaning for the immigrants and played out again the movement of their migration, ending, as we were told their migration had ended, at their mother's feet. The younger generations were invited to share in a very physical way the central event of their parents' histories both by participating in the annual procession as children and by undertaking their long journeys back to Harlem for the devotion in later years."

Robert Orsi, The Madonna of 115th Street, pp. 163-165.

 

Italy or East Harlem?

Italy or East Harlem?

law, logic, and the dark mother

law, logic, and the dark mother